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Full text of "Annual catalogue"

McMINNVILLE COLLEGE 



McMINNVILLE, OREGON 




HNNUHL CHTRLOGUE 



1894=5 



PRINTED FOR THE COLLEGE. 



. . . McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE . . 



DOES IT PAY TO ESTABLISH AND BUILD UP COLLEGES? 

"Planting colleges and filling them with studious young men and 
women is planting seed corn for the world." — Adoniram Judson. 

A college that makes a "glorious union of the highest learning with 
the deepest piety, is a light to lighten the nations and the glory of our 
Israel." — George W. Baton. 

Is a College Education Helpful to success in Business Life? 

"My own class in Harvard College numbered eighty-nine at gradu- 
ation. Eleven of that number, or one-eighth of the whole, have at- 
tained remarkable success in business. * * * In eastern 
Massachusetts graduates of Harvard get greatly more than their numer- 
ical proportion of the best places in banking, insurance, transportation 
and manufacturing. * * I speak from no little personal obser- 
vation when I say that there is no more striking general fact about the 
graduates of Harvard during the past fifty years than their eminent 
success in business. From one-fifth to one-third of the members of the 
successive graduating classes ultimately go into business. The same is 
probably true of many another American college." — President Elliott 
of Harvard University. 

Will it Pay to Send the Girls to College? 

"Hardly a week passes that fathers and mothers and teachers do 
not ask me whether it will pay to send some bright, ambitious girl to 
college. There is but one answer: If civilization pays, if education is 
not a mistake, if hearts and brains and souls aie more than the dress 
they wear, then, by every interest dear to a Christian republic, by all 
the hope we have of building finer characters than former generations 
have produced, give the girls the widest and the highest and the deep- 
est education we have dreamed of, and then regret that it is not better, 
broader and deeper. The civilization of the Anglo-Saxon race in Amer- 
ica depends upon the education physical, mental, moral and social of 
the women for the next fifty years." — Alice Freeman Palmer. 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 



COLLEGE CALENDAR, 1895=6 



1895 

Sept. 17, Tuesday, Entrance Examinations. 
Sept. 17, Tuesday, Fall Term Opens. 
Nov. 28, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day. 

III. l;^r y day 1 TermExaminations - 

Dec. 6, Friday, Fall Term Closes. 

Dec. 9, Monday, Winter Term Opens. 

Dec. 20, Class '94 Oratorical Contest. 

Dec. 21, to Dec. 29, Holiday Vacation. 

1896 

Jan. 30, Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

ES r|; sK^'i*™ Examinations, 

March 14, Friday, Winter Term Closes. 
March 17, Monday, Spring Term Opens. 
Jnne 8, Sunday, Educational Sermon. 
June 8, Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon. 
June 9, Monday, Philergian Exhibition. 
June 10, Tuesday, Class Day Exercises. 
June 10, Tuesday, Student's Reunion. 
June 9 to 11, Term Examinations. 
June 12, Wednesday, Commencement. 



.. McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE... 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1896. 

Hon. W. C. Johnson, L. L. D Oregon City 

Hon. Henry Failing Portland 

Hon. Joseph Cravens Independence 

D. C. LaToureTTE Oregon City 

N. J. Blagen Portland 

O. P. Coshow McMinnville 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1897. 

Rev. M. L. Rugg Salem 

Hon. J. N. Dolph Portland 

A. C. Chandler McMinnville 

John H. Smith Astoria 

B. F. Rhodes McMinnville 

H. S. GiLE Salem 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1898. 

Amasa Sanders McMinnville 

J. E. MaGERS McMinnville 

Dr. J. D. Baker McMinnville 

REV. C. A. Wooddy Portland 

Rev. R. D. Grant Portland 

Rev. H. L. Bo ardman Eugene 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Hon. W. C. Johnson, President. A. C. Chandler, Secretary. 

D. C. LaTOURETTE, Treasurer. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

J. D. Baker J. E. Magers B. F. Rhodes 

O. P. Coshow A. C. Chandler 



. . . McMINNVIL L E COL L EGE . . . 



FACULTY 



T. G. BROYVNSON, President, 

English Literature, Latin, Philosophy. 

EMANUEL NORTHUP, 

Mathematics, Greek, Bible Study. 

MRS. T. G. BROWNSON, 

Latin, French, German. 

W. F. FARGO, 

Sciences, Rhetoric, English. 

MRS. F. E. WOLFENDEN, 

Elocution, Music, Calisthenics, History 

EMANUEL NORTHUP, 

Librarian . 



The names of the Faculty appear in the order of their appointment. 



. . . McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE, . 



COURSES OF STUDY 



CLASSICAL COURSE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



FALL TERM 


WINTER TERM 


SPRING TERM 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Ctesar 


Cicero 


Cicero 


Elocution 


English Literature 


Rhetoric 


English Literature 


Bible History 


Botany 


Bible History 


Zoology 
SOPHOHORE YEAR 




Algebra 


Geometry 


Geometry 


Cicero 


Virgil 


Virgil 


English Literature 


American Literature 


German 


Biblical Biography 


Biblical Biography 


Xenophon 


Greek Reader 


Greek Reader 
JUNIOR YEAR 




Geometry 


Trigonometry 


Trig, and Surveying 


Virgil 


Livy 


Livy 


Xenophon 


Homer 


Homer 


German 


German 


German 


Biblical Literature 


SENIOR YEAR 




Analytical Geometry 


Analytical Geometry 


Psychology 


Political Economy 


Horace 


French 


Horace 


j Herodotus or 
(New Testament 


} Sophocles or 
]New Testament 


Herodotus 


French 


Moral Philosophy 



..McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



FALL TERM 


WINTER TERM 


SPRING TERM 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Caesar 


Cicero 


Cicero 


Elocution 


English Literature 


Rhetoric 


English Literature 


Bible History 


Botany 


Bible Historv 


Zoology 





SOPHOHORE YEAR 



Algebra 
Cicero 

English Literature 
Biblical Biography 
Chemistrv 



Geometry 

Virgil 

American Literature 

Biblical Biography 

Chemistry 



Geometry 
Virgil 
German 
Chemistry 



Geometry 

Virgil 

German 

Physics 

Biblical Literature 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Trigonometry 
Livy 
German 
Physics 



Trig, and Survey 

Livy 

German 

Physics 



SENIOR YEAR 



Horace 

Political Economy 

Analytical Geometry 

Geology 



Horace 

French 

Analytical Geometry 

A stron omv 



Moral Philosophy 
French 
Psychology 
Astronomy 



McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE. 



NORMAL COURSE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



TALL TERM 


WINTER TERM 


SPRING TERM 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Caesar 


Cicero 


Cicero 


Elocution 


English Literature 


Rhetoric 


English Literature 


Bible History 


Botanv 


Bible History 


Zoolog}^ 





Algebra 

Cicero 

English Literature 

Chemistry 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Geometry Geometry 

Virgil Virgil 

American Literature German 

Chemistry Chemistry 

JUNIOR YEAR 



Geometry 


Trigonometry 


Trig, and Survey 


Virgil 


Livy 


Livy 


German 


German 


German 


Physics 


Physics 


Physics 



Political Economy 

Geology 

Hist. Education 

Book-Keeping 



SENIOR YEAR 

French 
Astronomy 
School Management 
Art of Teaching 



French 
Psychology 
Moral Philosophy 
Astronomy 
Oreg. School Law 



„. McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 



LITERARY COURSE 





FIRST YEAR 




FALL TERM 


WINTER TERM 


SPRING TERM 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Caesar 


Cicero 


Cicero 


Elocution 


English Literature 


Rhetoric 


English Literature 


Bible History 


Botany 


Bible History 


Zoology 
SECOND YEAR 




Algebra 


Geometry 


Geometry 


English Literature 


American Literature 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


German 


German 


German 


Astronomy 



BUSINESS COURSE 



FALL TERM 



Arithmetic 
Algebra 

English Grammar 
English Literature 
General Historv 



Algebra 
Chemistry 
English Literature 
Book—Keeping 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER TERM 

Algebra 

Rhetoric 

English Literature 

Book-Keeping 

General History 

SECOND YEAR 

Geometry 
Chemistry 
American Literature 
Commercial Law 



SPRING TERM 

Algebra 

Rhetoric 

Botany 

Com. Arithmetic 

Book-Keeping 



Geometry 
Astronomy 
Chemistry 
Book-Keeping 



10 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE . . . 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 



Many students desiring the advantages of the college are not far 
enough advanced to enter the regular college classes. For the benefit 
of such students, a College Preparatory course of two years is offered. 
Some of the studies of this course are common school studies. It is 
confidently believed, however, that many students would save a full 
year of valuable time by entering this course as soon as they are fitted 
to do so. The decided majority of students ought to be ready to enter 
college at least a year earlier than they do enter. The trouble is that 
they have spent three years in doing work that they ought easily to 
have done in two. The average student who has had good advantages 
ought to be able to enter this two years course at the age of fourteen, 
then two years later enter the college course and graduate from it at 
twenty. Recognizing the importance of a thorough preparation as 
essential to the highest success in college, no pains will be spared to 
make this preparatory course one of the highest value. 



FIRST YEAR 



FALL TERM 

Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Geography 
Physiology 
U.S. History 
Reading 



Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
English Literature 
Latin Reader 
General History 



WINTER TERM 

Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Geography 
Mental Arithmetic 
U. S. History 
Reading 

SECOND YEAR 

El. Algebra 
English Grammar 
Physical Geography 
Latin Reader 
General History 



SPRING TERM 

Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Geography 
Mental Arithmetic 
Civil Government 
Reading 



El. Algebra 
English Grammar 
Phys. Geography 
Caesar 
General History 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 11 



THE COURSES OF STUDY DESCRIBED 



The courses of study offered in the Literary department are the 
Classical, the Scientific, the Normal, the Literary and the Business 
courses. They are given in full on the preceding pages. Attention is 
called to the fact that the principle of ELECTIVE STUDIES is here 
offered in its best form — a choice between courses of study. These 
courses have been marked out with great care and are believed to be 
fully equal, in the ground they cover, to similar courses in the very 
best schools of the United States. McMinnville college does not claim 
to be a university; it is a college, and here offers choice courses of study 
in those subjects that legitimately belong to the college. 

The aim of the college is to give such discipline of the mental 
powers as is essential to the highest success in business life, and at the 
same time to give a fair mastery of the branches that are here taught. 
To-day hundreds who expect to enter business life, as well as those who 
are looking toward the professions, are anxious to secure the broadest 
culture and the most thorough mental training. A brief description of 
the courses of study is here presented: 

The Classical Course gives a prominent place to Greek, Latin 
and Mathematics. A thorough study of mathematics is universally 
recognized as of the highest value. The Latin and Greek languages 
are unsurpassed store houses of intellectual strength. This course also 
furnishes opportunity for the study of French, German, Literature, 
History, Psychology and Philosophy. 

The Scientific Course retains the mathematics and Latin of the 
Classical course, but offers special advantages in the sciences and the 
modern languages. Chemistry, Botany, Physics, Zoology, Geology 
and Astronomy are given a prominent place during the last three years 
of the course. Text-books are used, but many experiments are given 
and much work done outside of the text-book. It is believed that this 
course as now offered is deserving of the heartiest patronage. 



t2 ... McMLMNVILLE COLLEGE... 



The Normal Course differs from the Scientific in that professional 
studies hold a prominent place in the senior year. The aim is to give 
both mental discipline and professional knowledge, together with such a 
mastery of the branches here studied as will fit the graduate for the 
highest positions in public school work. The second and third-rate 
positions in the public schools are overcrowded, but there is a 
strong and increasing demand for thoroughly equipped teachers. The 
course here offered is not a short and easy one. It will require five 
years of hard work to complete it. Teachers who expect to secure and 
hold prominent and well-paid positions in the public school, cannot 
afford to take a shorter course than this. Those completing either the 
Classical, Scientific, or the Normal course will be eligible to the state 
diploma as provided for by the legislature of 1891. 

The Literary Course is a carefully prepared course that can be 
completed in three years, and is offered to those who are not able to 
remain in school a longer time. It gives a fair amount of Latin and 
mathematics, and furnishes a considerable knowledge of the sciences 
and German. 

The Business Course offers a superior business education. "What- 
ever may be your choice of business pursuit, it should be remembered 
that the better you are qualified for it, the more likely you will be to 
succeed in it. It is a fact which cannot have escaped the notice of 
anyone who has given the matter any thought, that those who are the 
best educated for their business calling (other things being equal) 
invariably take the highest positions." These sentences from the pen 
of a prominent business man deserve the careful study of the youth of 
to-day. It is beyond dispute that a thorough business education is a 
prerequisite to eminent success in business life. Such an education 
can be obtained only by close application and persistent study; and it 
cannot be obtained in a few short months. The course here offered is 
none too thorough for those to master who expect to take prominent 
positions in business life. 



... McMINNVlLLE COLLEGE... 13 



ADMISSION 



To enter the college classes in the Classical, Scientific, Normal or 
Literary course, students will be required to pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion in the studies of the College Preparatory course found on page 10, 
or to furnish satisfactory evidence that they have fairl}- mastered these 
branches. Especial attention is called to the fact that the mastery of 
the common branches lies at the basis of all successful work in the 
studies pursued in the college course. Students deficient in reading, 
spelling, arithmetic, and English grammar would be especially crippled 
in higher branches, if allowed to enter upon them. To students who are 
deficient in any of the common branches, the College Preparatory 
course offers superior advantages under teachers of ability and wide 
experience. 



SPECIAL STUDIES 

Many students are so situated that they cannot see their way to take 
a regular course. To such students the best of advantages are offered 
to take such studies as they are fitted to pursue. Such students will 
have just as thorough instruction and just as good opportunities in 
every respect as those taking a regular course. Attention, however, is 
called to the fact that as a rule students receive more benefit by entering 
upon a regular course, even if they cannot see their way to complete 
that course. 



DEGREES 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon those who 
complete the Scientific course; that of Bachelor of Literature, upon 
those who complete either the Classical or the Normal course, and a 
certificate of graduation, upon those who complete the Literary, the 
Business, or the Musical course. 



14 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 



TRAINING OF TEACHERS 

The demand for college graduates to fill the best salaried positions 
in the public schools is increasing year by year. The day is close at 
hand when thousands of teachers must secure a better preparation for 
their work, or be crowded out by the better equipped teachers our 
colleges are educating. The public school is widening its course of 
study; one branch after another is added; it does not take the eye of a 
prophet to see that the elements of the various sciences are soon to be 
taught in the common school. All this means that the successful 
teacher must have a much more extensive education than most teachers 
to-day possess. To encourage college graduates to enter public school 
work, state legislatures are granting them state diplomas; a privilege 
until recently granted only to Normal schools. McMinnville College 
in its Normal course offers superior advantages to those who are to 
make teaching a specialty. That course is a thorough one but none too 
thorough for those who expect to be eminently successful in public 
school work. 



LEGISLATIVE ENACTHENT 

Be it enacted by the legislative assembly of the State of Oregon, 
That all persons who shall complete a required course of study and 
receive a literary degree therefore in any institution of learning of 
collegiate or university grade, chartered or incorporated under the laws 
of this state, and shall have passed such examination thereon as may be 
approved by the State Board of Education, shall be entitled to receive a 
State Diploma, as is now authorized by law, and after six years of 
successful teaching in the State of Oregon, shall be entitled to the 
State Life Diploma, as now provided by law, when they shall have paid 
the required fee for said diploma. 



... McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE. .. IS 



THE MUSICAL DEPARTMENT 



Recognizing that the fine arts are an important element in mental 
culture, and that attainments in instrumental and vocal music are of 
great practical value to young men and women , especial effort has been 
put forth, with marked success, to make the musical department of this 
college one of the best in the state. While the aim has been to secure 
the most efficient teaching that can be secured, it has also been the 
desire of the institution to make the tuition as low as possible, in order 
that those of limited means may avail themselves of the advantages 
that are offered. Superior instruction in vocal music in classes is 
offered at merely a nominal tuition. The value of the voice culture 
that is thus secured cannot be overestimated. Its value is seen not only 
in singing but in public speaking as well. 



COURSE OF STUDY 



VOCAL CULTURE 

Grades One and Two 

Formation of tones, focus of vibration and respiration; Concone's 
and Marchesis' studies. 

Advanced Grade 

Vaccai's Italian Method; Lablanche's and Abt's studies; ballads 
and arias from oratorios and operas. 



16 ... McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE. 



PIANO FORTE 



Preparatory Department 

Training of the hand and arm in position and movement. Mathews' 

"Lessons in Phrasing." Studies in Melody, Scales and Mason's 

Technique. 

First Year 

Lebert and Stark Book II. Kuhlau Sonatines, Haydn Sonatas, 
Technical Exercises and Scales from memory. Selections from 
Kohler, Holshhorn's op. 65, and Krause op. 4 and op. 2. 

Second Year 

Heller op. 46 and 47. Czerny op. 299, Mozart and Schubert Sona- 
tas, Spindler op. 141. Beren's studies in velocity; Piano Selections from 
classic and modern composers; Scales, Arpeggios and Mason's 

Technique. 

Third Year 

Bach's fugues. Kullak's Octave Studies. Beethoven Sonatas. 

Harmony begun. Studies from Cramer, Bertini, Chopin and modern 

composers. Technique continued. 

Fourth Year 

Clementi Gradus ad Parnassum. Bach's Well-Tempered 
Clavichord. Chopin Nocturnes and Ballades. Concertos by Men- 
delssohn, Hummel and Beethoven; also concert selections from Men- 
dlessohn, Weber, Rubenstein and Iyiszt. Harmony. 

All pupils entering the four years' course in Piano must have a 
knowledge of the rudiments of music, and must have completed the 
work of the preparatory department or its equivalent. 

The course of study in Piano-forte playing is systematically arranged, 
and pupils who complete the course will be graduated in Music with 
an appropriate diploma. The time occupied in completing this course 
will depend upon the ability of the pupil and the proportion of time 
devoted to Musical study. 

SIGHT=READING CLASS 

All pupils, whether they stxidy instrumental or vocal music, should 
enter the department of sight-reading. The ability to read music at 
sight lies at the basis of a true musical education. Very few among the 
thousands who are studying music are able to read even plain hymn 
tune correctly at sight, consequently labor under great disadvantage. 



... McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE... 17 



DEPARTMENT OF BIBLE STUDY. 



The aim of this department is to give the student a helpful know- 
ledge of the English Bible. The intense study of this book stimulates 
intellectual development, and fits men for success in any honorable 
calling of life. This study is especially valuable to young people who 
are accomplishing year by year a more important work in the eleva- 
tion of societv. To fit these for this work is certainly an important 
function of the christian college. 

The Bible is studied as a book of History, Biography, Literature 
and Morals. The history of the Jewish people, their contact with 
other nations, their influence upon their own and later times, and the 
leading elements of their greatness, receive special attention. As biog" 
raphy the Bible is a book of thrilling interest. The lives of such men 
as Abraham, Jacob, Moses, Joshua, Samuel, Nehemiah, David, Daniel, 
John, Peter, and Paul, deserve the most careful study by young people 
who are soon to be leaders of society. The elements of character that 
gave these men success will bring success today, whatever the life 
calling. As literature, the English Bible is the world's masterpiece. 
The great English writers studied it profoundly; and the person who is 
ignorant of it cannot appreciate such writers as Shakespeaie, Milton, 
Bunyan, Bacon, Byron, Pope, Wordsworth and Tennyson. It con- 
tains the choicest diction, the most forceful expression of thought, and 
the most eloquent passages to be found in the English language. 
Hence its careful and continued study by those who would be masters 
in the expression of thought, is of the highest value. 

As a book of morals, the Bible holds a unique place; no book in the 
literature of the world approaches it in its elevating influence upon the 
moral life of individuals and of nations. Every wave of successful re- 
form that has swept over society, abolishing human slavery, restrain- 
ing cruelty to man and beast, opposing the vice of intemperance, at- 
tempting the elevation of politics in cities and nations, ennobling the 
life of the home, and purifying the relation of man to man, has found 
its source and inspiration in the sacred writings. Hence there is the 
highest plea for the Bible as a text book in the christian college. 

In addition to study in these four lines, the senior class may elect, 
under the supervision of the faculty, further study to the amount of 
one-fourth of their full work. It is confidently believed that this may 
be made a full equivalent to the study whose place it may take. 



18 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1895-6. 



The most cheering announcement to be made, and one affecting 
in a marked way the college in all of its departments of work, for the 
coming year, is that the recent effort to add $20,000 to its funds has 
been successful. This has been secured in good subscriptions, and 
a considerable part of it will be paid earty this fall. This places the 
college upon a much better financial basis, and opens the way for new 
features that have heretofore been impracticable. 

The Courses of Study in this catalogue are those to be followed 
the coming year. Several changes have been made. General History 
will occupy three terms instead of two, thus giving large opportunity 
for investigation and work outside of the text book. Chemistry and 
Physics has each been changed from two to three ' terms. These are 
taught largely by laboratory practice. The enlarged laboratory facili- 
ties year by year are provoking increasing enthusiasm in the study of 
the natural sciences. Much better facilities will be offered in the near 
future. The course in mathematics has been strengthened by the ad- 
dition of half a year of Analytical Geometry; and several other minor 
changes have been made, thus making the courses in some important 
features better and stronger than heretofore. 

The establishment of a Department of Bible Study is only carry- 
ing into effect a long cherished desire. This department will be built 
up as rapidly as circumstances will justify. At an early day an effort 
will be made to secure an endowment of at least $10,000, the income of 
which shall be used exclusively in sustaining this department. Much 
attention will be given to this study the coming year along the lines 
suggested on another page. 

Financial Assistance will be rendered to needy and worthy stu- 
dents by giving them work on the college campus and elsewhere. Much 
larger effort than heretofore will also be made to render direct help to 
students of promise, especially those having the Baptist ministry or 



McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE... 19 



Baptist missionary work in view. The advanced financial condition of 
the college makes this possible. Henceforth all necessary financial 
help can be rendered approved students for Baptist ministry or missionary 
work after they have reached the Sophomore year. Some help may be 
rendered before that, but certainly deserving students can reach that 
point by their own efforts, with help in sight from there on through 
their course. This help must of course come chiefly from the friends 
of the college, but their increased number and loyalty are the assur- 
ance that it will come as needed. 

English Composition and Oratory will receive still more attention 
the coming year than in previous years. To know how to express 
thought upon paper clearly, forcibly and elegantly is a great accom- 
plishment. Perhaps it is a still greater accomplishment to be able to 
speak effectively before an audience. The Philergian Society in its 
weekly literary meetings has accomplished a great work along these 
lines. It seems to become more efficient year by year. The Friday 
night literary and musical entertainments have also come to be an ex- 
ceedingly interesting and valuable feature of the college life. In 
these, as well as in the more direct teaching in composition and ora- 
tory, these subjects will receive increasing attention the coming year. 

The Class of '94 Oratorical Prize will stimulate both good writ- 
ing and good speaking. That class has subscribed a fund, the interest 
of which will be divided annually into four prizes, excellence in both 
composition and oratory being taken into account. The first contest 
will be held Friday night, Dec. 20th, 1895. Members of the Junior 
and Senior classes may compete. Orations are limited to 900 words 
each. The prizes for the first contest will be $5.50, $5, $4.50, $4. 
Each oration is to be upon one of the following subjects: "The Secret 
of Japanese Success in the Late War;" "The Function of the Scholar 
in Political Life;" "Elements of Leadership in James A. Garfield;" 
"The Need of College Graduates in Journalism." 

Physical Culture and Health Producing Recreation will be much 
better provided for the coming year than ever before in the history of 
the college. The old ball ground was given up from necessity. A 



20 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 



larger and better one has been set apart directly west of the college 
building. Two fine tennis courts have been made east of the building. 
A gymnasium will be erected in the early fall, and already provision 
has been made in part by the students to furnish it with the most ap- 
proved apparatus. It has long been a pressing need, and will be 
highly appreciated. A time will be set apart for practice for the girls 
as well as the boys, with a teacher in charge. 

Last, But By No Means Least, is the announcement that it has 
been decided to put bath rooms in the building with hot and cold water. 
That "cleanliness is next to godliness" may not be scriptural in word- 
ing, but it certainly does not violate scripture teaching. This ad- 
vance step has long been desired, but many pressing demands pre- 
vented. This step will certainly be a source of satisfaction to the old 
students; even if they cannot receive its benefits. The "old times" 
were good, but the "times of the now" are much better. These ad- 
vance steps are certainly an indication that McMinnville College has 
entered upon a new era of prosperity. Its finances are much in ad- 
vance of any preceding year; its teachers are well-equipped for their 
work, with years of successful experience here; the circle of its friends 
is enlarging rapidly, and they were never so enthusiastic as now; its 
advantages are improving year by year; the expenses are within the 
means of all who are really ambitious to get a college education. This 
institution surely deserves your careful consideration before you de- 
cide to go elsewhere. 



McMlNNVlLLE COLLEGE... 21 



EXPENSES. 



Tuition is$ii a term. Unfurnished room, $3, $4, $5 a term, each 
student, according to room. Furnished room, student to room alone, 
$4.50, $6, $8 a term, according to room. Furnished room, two students 
in room, $5.50 and $7 each student according to room. Fuel, each room, 
per year$8, $10, $12, according to room. Extra elocution lessons, in class- 
es of eight, one lesson a week, $1 a term. Private lessons in elocution, $5 
a term. Vocal music, in class, twenty-four lessons, $1.25 a term. 
Private lessons in voice culture, on the piano, organ, banjo or guitar, 
per term, $8.50. When two lessons a week are taken, a reduction of 
ten per cent, is given. Use of piano one hour a day, $3 per term. 
Diploma, $5. Chemicals for laboratory work, $3 to $5. Each student 
is to pay the actual cost of chemicals he uses. 

All bills are to be paid in advance. 

Inquiry is often made as to the cost for a year. The expense varies 
according to the room a student occupies, and whether two students 
room together. The following table covers all the necessary expenses 
except for lessons in elocution or music: lowest highest 

Table board for the school year $ 92 50 $92 50 

Tuition 33 00 33 00 

Fuel and Lights 8 00 18 00 

Furnished room 13 50 24 00 

Washing 7 00 10 00 

Books 8 00 12 00 

$162 00 $189 50 

In addition to this, each student ought to join the Philergian society, 
which will cost some $2 or $3 a year. Each student is advised to join 
the Missionary society, which costs seventy-five cents a year. Each 
student is also advised to take either elocution or music lessons. This 
extra expense is money well spent. Counting in these extra expenses, 
and the entire cost of a year need not exceed $200. At these figures, 
any young man or woman of good health ought not to hesitate a single 
minute about obtaining a college education. 



22 ... McMlNNVILLE COLLEQB... 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



LOCATION. 

McMmnville College is located just outside the city limits of Mc- 
Mitniville, Oregon. McMinnville is easily accessible from eveiy part 
of the North Pacific coast, being situated on the Southern Pacific rail- 
road, west side division, 50 miles south of Portland. From all points 
south there is direct connection, by the way of Albany and Corvallis, 
or by stage from Salem to McCoy, and thence by the Southern Pacific 
to McMinnville; from all points east and north there is direct connection 
by way of Portland. 

••• 

BUILDING AND GROUNDS. 

The College has a campus of 30^ acres, admirably adapted for the 
purpose and beautiful for situation. Upon this campus there was built 
in 1882 one of the finest buildings for educational purposes to be found 
on the Pacific coast. The building is 106 feet in length, 79 in breadth, 
and four stories in height. The basement storj^ contains accommoda- 
tions for a boarding department; the second affords a commodious 
chapel, president's rooms, class rooms, etc.; the third and fourth, reci- 
tation rooms, library, a number of rooms for students, and Philergian 
hall. Recently an observatory has been erected and a fine telescope 
mounted. It is an equatorial; good authority claims it to be the best 
instrument north of Mt. Hamilton. It has already given a new im- 
petus to the study of the sciences. 



DISCIPLINE. 

Self-government is the ideal at McMinnville College. Students are 
expected to conform to the usages of good society, and to conduct them- 
selves as they would in a refined, well-ordered home. Only those who 
are willing to do so are desired as pupils. No set of rules to cover all 
cases can be laid down. A high moral sense is necessary to guide a 
student in a society like this. If a student does not have this, and it 
cannot be developed in him, his parents will be notified, after a due 
trial, to remove him from the school. This is not a reform school; 
young men are expected to give evidence of manhood, and young 
women of womanhood. 



...McMlNNVILLB COLLEGE... 23 



TEXT=BOOKS. 

Only a partial list of text-books is here given: Arithmetic, White 
and Milne; grammar, Whitney, Reed and Kellogg; algebra, Robinson's 
elementary, Taylor; geometry, trigonometry, Wentworth; general 
history, Barnes; rhetoric, Hill; physiology, Hutchinson; physical geog- 
raphy, Houston; Latin grammar, Harkness; Latin reader, Harper and 
Burgess; Harkness' Preparatory Course in Latin Prose Authors; Virgil, 
Harper; Greek grammar, Goodwin; The Beginners' Greek Book, 
White; Anabasis, Goodwin; physics, Avery; chemistry, Shepard; 
English literature, for reference, Shaw, Backus and Brown, Welsh, 
Coppee, Arnold and Cleveland; psychology, Hill; geology, Dana; 
astronomy, Young; French, Ahn; German, Ahn; zoology, Orton; bot- 
anv, Bastin; political economy, Laughlin; moral philosophy, Robin- 
son; Bible study, Steele; bookkeeping, Bryant; school management, 
Baldwin. 

THE LIBRARY. 

The library, has grown steadily, year by year, and is now recognized 
as one of the best college libraries on the Pacific coast, though many 
new books are imperatively needed. Valuable additions of nearly ioo 
volumes have been made the last year. The books have recently been 
rearranged and classified so as to greatly facilitate their use. We look 
to the friends of the college for help to make the library still better. 
We need additions in history, English literature, biography and sci- 
ence; especially in the Department of Bible Stud}'. 



THE READING ROOM. 

A partial list of the papers and magazines in the reading room this 
year is the following: The Examiner, Standard, Christian Herald, 
Pacific Baptist, Baptist Teacher, Baptist Union, Epworth Herald, 
Christian Advocate, Cumberland Presbyterian, Worker, Missionary 
Magazine, Home Mission Monthly, Education, North American Re- 
view, Review of Reviews, Missionary Review, Chautauquan, Educa- 
tional Re view T , School Review, Forum, Atlantic Monthly, Reporter, 
Telephone, Dayton Herald, Voice, Inter-Ocean, Northwestern Christ- 
ian Advocate, and Daily Oregonian. Most of these will be in the read- 
ing room the coming year. Contributions to this room are solicited. 



24 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 



SOCIETIES. 

The Philergian Society, composed of young ladies and gentlemen, 
meets regularly each Saturday evening. The exercises, consisting of 
singing, essays, debates, recitations, orations, declamations, etc., are of 
great value to the students. The special feature of the society is its 
debates upon vital questions of the day. 

The Missionary Society holds a public meeting once a month. 
During the present year these meetings have been held the third 
Sunday afternoon, and have been full of interest. 

There is also a Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. These hold meetings 
regularly for the study of the Bible and for religious culture. These 
meetings have proved to be of great benefit to many students, encourag- 
ing them in christian work, and fitting them for larger usefulness in 
after years. 



AID TO STUDENTS. 

It is the aim of the college to assist worthy students in every way 
possible. The chief way at present of rendering financial assistance is 
by furnishing work. During the present year several young men and 
women have earned a considerable part of their expenses in this way. 
The college can help students the coming year considerably by giving 
them work in improving the campus. To a very limited extent, appeals 
have been made to friends and churches to assist worthy students. 
Special efforts will hereafter be put forth to assist such students of ap- 
proved ability and fitness during the sophomore, junior and senior 
years. Quite a number of students each year obtain work in the vicin- 
ity of the college. Several young women each year get opportunity to 
work for their board in private families. One of the leading purposes 
of the Oregon Baptist Education Society is to assist young men study- 
ing for the ministry, and young women fitting themselves for mission- 
ary service. President Brownson is the Corresponding Secretary of that 
society. He will be glad to receive applications for help from those 
who are needy and worthy. 



...McMFNNVILLE COLLEGE... 25 



ROOMS AND BOARD. 

The boarding department the last two years has been under the 
general supervision of the president of the college. The aim is to fur- 
nish board at approximate cost. The price of table board is guaran- 
teed not to exceed $2.50 per week. Everything is purchased for cash. 
Buying in large quantities for cash, better board can be offered at $2.50 
a week than a private family could afford to give at the same price. On 
the third floor of the college building are rooms for a limited number of 
boys. The president's living rooms are on the first floor. On the same 
floor are rooms for a limited number of girls. Most of the rooms are 
unfurnished, except with a stove. Students wishing furnished rooms 
are requested to notify the president in advance. All of the rooms 
have high ceilings and large windows, and so are superior for ventila- 
tion and light. Furnished rooms can be obtained at reasonable price 
within a few minutes walk of the college. Quite a number of students 
club together and rent a house and board themselves, thus saving a 

large part of the expense. 

REQUIREMENTS. 

Regular attendance at chapel service, and at recitations, faithful 
observance of study hours, and payment of all damages to furniture and 
building. The use of tobacco in the building or on the college grounds, 
and the visiting of any saloon or billiard hall, are forbidden. In addi- 
tion to these requirements, students are expected to attend preaching 
services regularly on the Sabbath at some church. Baptist, Christian, 
Cumberland Presbyterian, Episcopal and Methodist Episcopal hold 
regular services. Students are excused from study hours one night 
each week for the purpose of attending the regular prayer service of 
some church, if they so desire. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Are held from time to time, occupying the time of the regular rec- 
itation. As a rule examinations are also held at the close of each term; 
sometimes at the close of a study only, when it comes near the end of a 
term. All recitations and examinations are marked on a scale of 100 
and an average of 80 is required before passing from one class to an- 
other. An accurate record of the standing of each student is preserved, 
both of recitations and examinations. Reports will be sent to parents 
or guardians on application. 



26 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 



URGENT NEEDS. 

A growing institution has needs that become very urgent. Pro- 
vision has been made to meet some of the needs that were pressing a 
a year ago, but others almost equally imperative must soon be pro- 
vided for. The most urgent are the following: 

I. AN ENDOWMENT FUND OF TEN THOUSAND DOLLARS 
FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF BIBLE STUDY. A beginning on this 
ought to be made the coming year. Friends of the college have advo- 
cated for several years the establishment of this department. The op- 
portunity has come for them to show their interest by their gifts. Why 
not have this department endowed by a multitude of small givers? 

II. Ten scholarships of five hundred dollars each. The 
college can no longer afford to let promising students leave school with 
their course only half completed, when the interest on a five hundred 
dollar scholarship would enable them to graduate. Let us have several of 
these scholarships; and later they can be increased in amount if found 
desirable. Money invested in this way in young men and women of 
promise will pay more than ten per cent, interest to the investor. Try it. 

III. Enlarged laboratory facilities and more apparatus. 
The development of the scientific department has been one of the 
most encouraging features in the growth of the college. Much further 
development cannot be made without larger accommodations and more 
apparatus. The importance of this line of work in the college of to-day 
can hardly be over estimated. Are there not friends who will as spec- 
ial gifts provide the few hundred dollars just now urgently needed? 

IV. Another building. Year by year this need becomes more 
urgent. The dormitory facilities are very limited; the department of 
natural science has outgrown the best accommodations that can now be 
offered; the need of at least two large recitation rooms is very pressing: 
the only solution seems to be another building. It need not be very 
large nor very expensive, but it ought to be begun this fall and com- 
pleted the coming year. The best interests of the college make a loud 
call for this undertaking. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 27 



HAVE YOU MADE A WILL? 

If so, did you remember McMinnville College? If you did not, 
will you not reconsider and ask the Lord if it will not be to his glory 
for you to change that will? If you have not made a will and are going 
to do so, will you not make McMinnville College one of your heirs? Do 
not write your own will. Be sure that the correct legal name of the in- 
stitution is used. 

The following form of a bequest is suggested: "I give, devise 
and bequeath to THE TRUSTEES OF THE BAPTIST COLLEGE AT 
M'MINNVILLE, Oregon, to be invested by them, the sum of * * * 
The interest on this fund may be used as they decide, either to 
meet the current expenses or to assist deserving and approved 
students." 

A WORD TO PARENTS. 

If you cannot give your sons and daughters anything else, give 
them a good education. It may call for self-denial and sacrifice on 
your part, but you can well afford to make it. Try and keep them in 
school every school day in the year. Then remember that it is of the 
utmost importance in what school you educate your sons and daughters. 
You cannot afford to educate them in any other than a Christian school. 
If you are a Baptist you cannot afford to educate them in any other 
than a Baptist school. If you are a Baptist in Oregon, why not edu- 
cate them in McMinnville College? 

SPECIAL REQUEST. 

You who receive this catalogue will receive it because you are be- 
lieved to be deeply interested in higher education. Your help in the 
building up of McMinnville College is earnestly solicited. There are 
many ways in which you can do so. You can speak a good word for 
the college. You can place this catalogue in the hands of persons 
whose thoughts and hearts may be turned to the college. You can 
send the president names of persons who might be favorably influenced 
by a catalogue or a personal letter from him. You can remember this 
school in your prayers; you can remember it in your will. The college 
looks to you for help in one or all of these various ways. 



28 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE.. 



NAMES OF STUDENTS- 



SENIORS. 

Edith E. Brown North Yamhill Scientific 

Ethlyn M. Million Stevensville, Montana Scientific 

John M. Root Newberg Business 

Ralph E. Storey McMinnville Classical 

JUNIORS. 

Florence Alexander Independence Scientific 

Lewis Alderman Dayton Scientific 

Albert Huguelet McMinnville Classical 

Coleman Mark Aurora Scientific 

Jewell Mark Aurora Scientific 

SOPHOMORES. 

Delia Baxter Dayton Classical 

Bennie Blood Carlton Scientific 

Clair Brown Burns Scientific 

Etta Cook McMinnville Scientific 

Blanche Derr McMinnville Scientific 

Dotha Daniels McMinnville Scientific 

Charles Galloway McMinnville Scientific 

Zilpha Galloway McMinnville Scientific 

Nellie Latourette Oregon City Classical 

Dettie Masterson Independence Normal 

Charles P. Nelson McMinnville Scientific 

Gertrude Palmer Dayton Scientific 

J. h. Root Newberg Classical 

Paulina Rossner Dayton Special 

Edna Scofield Forest Grove Scientific 

Fannie Smith Brownsville Scientific 

William Ungerman McMinnville Scientific 

Frank Weed McMinnville Classical 

D. C. Williams Merlin '. Classical 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE... 29 



FRESHMEN 



Karl Baker McMinnville Scientific 

Maud Bryant Clatskanie Scientific 

Charles Converse Carlton Scientific 

Mayrae Carr La Grande Scientific 

J.J. Carr La Grande Scientific 

Lizzie Davis McMinnville Scientific 

Edith Eborall McMinnville Scientific 

Esther Eborall McMinnville Scientific 

Ora Gillham Clatskanie Scientific 

Mabel Hayden McMinnville Business 

Henry W. Hayden McMinnville Scientific 

E. L. Holcroft Portland Scientific 

Jessie Manning McMinnville Scientific 

Eunice Mundinger McMinnville Business 

Anna A. Pagenkopf Wellsdale Scientific 

Horace Ramsey McMinnville Classical 

May Rogers McMinnville Scientific 

Vivian E. Rowton Eggleston, Mo . Scientific 

Laura B. Smith Hoquiam, Wash Scientific 

Edward Schenk McMinnville Scientific 

Fern Stout McMinnville Scientific 

Herbert Toney McMinnville Scientific 

Mary E. Weston Amity Business 

Jennie C. Woodward Hawley, Minn Special 

PREPARATORY. 

Cora Bryant Clatskanie 

Lois Ford McMinnville ! 

Nellie Lemons Independence 

Nellie McCain McMinnville 

Edith Manning Seattle, Wash 

Jessie Nelson McMinnville 

Mabel Smith Wheatland 



30 



. . . McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE.. . 



INSTRUflENTAL MUSIC AND ELOCUTION. 



Florence Alexander i 
Mabel Baker 2 
Mamie Carr 3 
Etta Cook 4 
Esther Eborall 5 
Edith Eborall 6 
Lois Ford 7 
Luella Lynch 8 
Edith Manning 9 



Lena McCain 10 
Ida Pagenkopf 11 
Fern Stout 1 2 
Sadie Smith 13 
Mabel Smith 14 
Rebecca Smith 15 
Ida Scofield 16 
Freda Latourette 17 
Lulu Wilcox 18 
May Rogers 19. 



VOCAL MUSIC AND HARMONY. 



Florence Alexander 1 
Louis Alderman 2 
Clair Brown 3 
Edith Brown 4 
Karl Baker 5 
Cora Bryant 6 
Bennie Blood 7 
Mamie Carr 8 
Charlie Converse 9 
Joe Carr 10 
Clarence Cook 11 
Zilpha Galloway 12 
E. Holcroft 13 
Albert Huguelet 14 
C. H. Howard 15 
Mabel Haydn 16 



Luella Lynch 17 
Lettie Masterson 18 
Jessie Manning 19 
Edith Manning 20 
Charlie Nelson 21 
Anna Pagenkopf 22 
John Root 23 
Lorenzo Root 24 
Vivian Rowton 25 
Fern Stout 26 
Frances Smith 27 
Rebecca Smith 28 
David Williams 29 
Herbert Toney 30 
Ralph Storey 31 
Mary Weston 32 



McMlNNVlLLE COLLEGE ... 



31 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



An attempt is here made to give the names and year of graduation 
of students completing either an academic or collegiate course of study 
since 1884. Information as to students completing any course of study 
before that date is desired. The college conferred its first degree in 
that year. In 1893, radical changes in the courses of study were author- 
ized by the trustees, and graduation from the academic department 
was discontinued. Those graduating from the collegiate department 
are designated by the degrees they received at graduation. 



1884 
John H. Smith A. B. 
E . F. Clark 
Emma Matthews 
C.J. Powell 
B. F. Rhodes 

1885 
H. Lt. Boardman 
M. D. L. Rhodes 
Edwin Russ 
W. S. Thompson 
Anna Turner 

1886 
Bertha Maddock 
Louis Maddock 
Elmer Purvine 

1887 
A. M. Sanders A. B. 
J. H. Cook 
S. B. Crandall 
Lora Hunsaker 
Corwin Shank 



1888 
J. F. Clark A. B. 
G. N. Maddock 
Alta Porter 
J. R. Sanders 
Ida Skinner 

1889 
Edwin Russ A. B 
Addie Clark 
Sara Coshow 
Mattie Walton 

1890 
J. H. Cook A. B. 
A. W. Baird 
Deane Cook 
Nina Latourette 
Frank Matthews 
Corrie McCown 
Laura Myers 
Nettie Olds 
J. W. Scott 
Lena Shelton 



32 



. . . McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE . . . 



1891 
Elmer Purvine A. B. 
Ida Skinner A. B. 
L. E. Latourette 
Arthur McPhillips 
Willie Scott 
Wm. Simpson 
Julia Mark 
R. E. Storey 
Daisy Young 

1892 
Florence Alexander 
Mitchell Haynes 
Luella Lynch 
W. P. Risley 
Arthur Royse 

1893 
Arthur McPhillips B. L. 
Mattie Walton B. L. 
Edith E. Brown 
Delia Garrison 
Edward Graham 
John Loder 



Geo. Handley 

Jewell Mark 

Lena Pagenkopf 

Rebecca Smith 

Etta Stetson 

Singne Swanson 

Marian Sully 
1894 

Abbie Bryant B. S. 

Ella Gary B. S. 
J. W. Loder B. S. 
Luella Lynch B. S. 
L. E. Latourette A. B. 
B. May Million B. S. 
Ida Pagenkopf B. L. 
Willie Scott B. L. 
W. T. Fellows B. L. 

1895 
Ethlyn Million B. S. 
John M. Root Bus. Course 
R. E. Storey B. L. 
Edith E. Brown B. S.